Cogitations with a Ginger
The time will come when diligent research over long periods will bring to light things that now lie hidden. A single life time, even though entirely devoted to research, would not be enough for the investigation of so vast a subject… . And so this knowledge will be unfolded through long successive…

theburiedlife:

After 6 years of crossing things off our list we’ve noticed some patterns. Whether it’s playing ball with Obama or writing a #1 New York Times Bestseller, these are the 6 steps we’ve used to cross anything off our list:

#1. Stop and think about it. Really think about it.

What is it that…

scinerds:

Learning In Your Sleep
Image: Your brain is so eager to learn that it does so even while you sleep, scientists recently found. Credit: National Institute of General Medical Sciences
Sleeping and learning go hand in hand, studies have shown for years. Even a brief nap can boost your memory and sharpen your thinking. But the relationship goes deeper than that. In a new study, scientists report that the brain can actually learn something new during sleep.
Scientists used to believe that a sleeping brain was taking a break. But it turns out it can be taught a thing or two, scientists reported in a scientific journal published in August.
“The brain is not passive while you sleep,” neuroscientist Anat Arzi told Science News. “It’s quite active. You can do quite a lot of things while you are asleep.” Arzi researches olfaction, or the sense of smell, at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel. She worked on the new study.
Arzi and her coworkers didn’t try to teach the sleeping volunteers any complex information, like new words or facts. (So sleeping on top of your study notes won’t boost your grades.) Instead, the scientists taught snoozing volunteers to make new connections between smells and sounds.
When we smell something nice, like a flower, we automatically take deep breaths. When we smell something bad, like the stench of a dumpster, we automatically take short breaths. These natural reactions maximize our exposure to good smells and minimize our exposure to bad ones. Arzi and her coworkers based their experiment on these reactions and the knowledge that our senses don’t turn off while we slumber.
Once the volunteers fell asleep in the lab, the scientists went to work. They gave the volunteers a whiff of something pleasant, like shampoo, and at the same time played a particular musical note. The volunteers didn’t wake up, but they did hear — and sniff deeply. Then the scientists gave the volunteers a whiff of something repulsive, like rotten fish, and played a different musical note. Again, the volunteers heard and smelled — a short snort this time — but didn’t wake up. The researchers repeated the experiment while the volunteers slept.
After just four repetitions, volunteers made a connection between the musical notes and their paired smells. When the scientists played the musical tone that went with good smells, the sleepers inhaled deeply — even though there was no good smell to sniff. And when the scientists played the musical tone that went with foul odors, the sleepers inhaled briefly — despite there being no bad smell.
“They learned what the tone signified,” Arzi concluded.
The next day, the volunteers woke up with the sound-smell connection intact. They inhaled deeply when hearing one tone and cut their breaths short when hearing the other. Which must have been odd for them: Imagine walking down the street and taking a deep breath upon hearing a particular sound!

scinerds:

Learning In Your Sleep

Image: Your brain is so eager to learn that it does so even while you sleep, scientists recently found. Credit: National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Sleeping and learning go hand in hand, studies have shown for years. Even a brief nap can boost your memory and sharpen your thinking. But the relationship goes deeper than that. In a new study, scientists report that the brain can actually learn something new during sleep.

Scientists used to believe that a sleeping brain was taking a break. But it turns out it can be taught a thing or two, scientists reported in a scientific journal published in August.

“The brain is not passive while you sleep,” neuroscientist Anat Arzi told Science News. “It’s quite active. You can do quite a lot of things while you are asleep.” Arzi researches olfaction, or the sense of smell, at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel. She worked on the new study.

Arzi and her coworkers didn’t try to teach the sleeping volunteers any complex information, like new words or facts. (So sleeping on top of your study notes won’t boost your grades.) Instead, the scientists taught snoozing volunteers to make new connections between smells and sounds.

When we smell something nice, like a flower, we automatically take deep breaths. When we smell something bad, like the stench of a dumpster, we automatically take short breaths. These natural reactions maximize our exposure to good smells and minimize our exposure to bad ones. Arzi and her coworkers based their experiment on these reactions and the knowledge that our senses don’t turn off while we slumber.

Once the volunteers fell asleep in the lab, the scientists went to work. They gave the volunteers a whiff of something pleasant, like shampoo, and at the same time played a particular musical note. The volunteers didn’t wake up, but they did hear — and sniff deeply. Then the scientists gave the volunteers a whiff of something repulsive, like rotten fish, and played a different musical note. Again, the volunteers heard and smelled — a short snort this time — but didn’t wake up. The researchers repeated the experiment while the volunteers slept.

After just four repetitions, volunteers made a connection between the musical notes and their paired smells. When the scientists played the musical tone that went with good smells, the sleepers inhaled deeply — even though there was no good smell to sniff. And when the scientists played the musical tone that went with foul odors, the sleepers inhaled briefly — despite there being no bad smell.

“They learned what the tone signified,” Arzi concluded.

The next day, the volunteers woke up with the sound-smell connection intact. They inhaled deeply when hearing one tone and cut their breaths short when hearing the other. Which must have been odd for them: Imagine walking down the street and taking a deep breath upon hearing a particular sound!

But finally I realized this truth – being an entrepreneur is more about a mindset than a skillset. It’s about believing so passionately in your work that there is no other option but to do it.

Selena Soo (Entrepreneur and founder of S2 Group) in the Forbes Article “I’m excited about turning 30 and here’s why”


(via crushnewyork)

I write books and either people read them or they don’t read them. The rise of Facebook or e-books doesn’t change the difficulty level of writing sentences and thinking up new ideas.
collaborativefund:

Visas for entrepreneurs
“Singapore offers visas to people who invest $40,000; for some, the government provides additional investment. Britain gives visas to entrepreneurs who meet certain conditions and attract £50,000 ($77,000) of venture funding. New Zealand has no specific capital requirement but offers residency to entrepreneurs whose firms are deemed to benefit the country. Chile is wildly generous: its government gives selected start-ups $40,000 without taking any equity in return.” 
(via)

collaborativefund:

Visas for entrepreneurs

“Singapore offers visas to people who invest $40,000; for some, the government provides additional investment. Britain gives visas to entrepreneurs who meet certain conditions and attract £50,000 ($77,000) of venture funding. New Zealand has no specific capital requirement but offers residency to entrepreneurs whose firms are deemed to benefit the country. Chile is wildly generous: its government gives selected start-ups $40,000 without taking any equity in return.”

(via)

collaborativefund:

Peer-to-peer lending has gone from almost $0 to $1,000,000,000 is 6 years. 
(via)

collaborativefund:

Peer-to-peer lending has gone from almost $0 to $1,000,000,000 is 6 years. 

(via)

betterby30me:

How to be interesting (in 10 stupid-simple steps):

1.Go exploring. Explore ideas, places, and opinions. The inside of the echo chamber is where all the boring people hang out.

2. Share what you discover. And be generous when you do. Not everybody went exploring with you. Let them live vicariously through your adventures.

3. Do something. Anything. Dance. Talk. Build. Network. Play. Help. Create. It doesn’t matter what you do, as long as you’re doing it. Sitting around and complaining is not an acceptable form of ‘something,’ in case you were wondering.

4. Embrace your innate weirdness. No one is normal. Everyone has quirks and insights unique to themselves. Don’t hide these things—they are what make you interesting.

5. Have a cause. If you don’t give a damn about anything, no one will give a damn about you.

6. Minimize the swagger. Egos get in the way of ideas. If your arrogance is more obvious than your expertise, you are someone other people avoid.

7. Give it a shot. Try it out. Play around with a new idea. Do something strange. If you never leave your comfort zone, you won’t grow.

8. Hop off the bandwagon. If everyone else is doing it, you’re already late to the party. Do your own thing, and others will hop onto the spiffy wagon you built yourself. Besides, it’s more fun to drive than it is to get pulled around.

9. Grow a pair. Bravery is needed to have contrary opinions and to take unexpected paths. If you’re not courageous, you’re going to be hanging around the water cooler, talking about the guy who actually is.

10. Ignore the scolds. Boring is safe, and you will be told to behave yourself. The scolds could have, would have, should have. But they didn’t. And they resent you for your adventures.

5 Simple Reasons why E[nstitute] > College





Comparing it to the average college experience it’s a no brainer.

 

#1   They pay for everything for you to live in NYC. 

#2   It’s only 2 years. 

#3   Access to this network of incredible companies in one of the most exciting cities in the world.  

#4   Learn directly from someone who has built and is building things. 

#5   Actually doing work instead of in class talking about doing work.

 

Questions For Your First Class Listing


Last week, I went to How to Teach a Skillshare Class with one of Skillshare’s newer team members.

I already had a few ideas coming in but also had apprehension about listing and marketing the class. By the end after going through a few activities, she answered all my questions, and I didn’t have any reasons not to post a class (Check it out!). 

I wrote down a few questions from the class that really helped me think about the class and get my creativity going.

You don’t have to answer all of these, but some may help with brainstorming. If you’re stuck, use this as starting point to figure out where you want to go.
 

Thinking about a Class

Read More


"An Open Marketplace for Educators"

One woman earned 700K selling her lesson plans through this website.
http://news.yahoo.com/kindergarten-teacher-earns-700-000-selling-lesson-plans-200139239.html

Lovin’ this p2p company. 

Learning to Code Learning Curve

collaborativefund:

What you think it will feel like.

What it’s actually like.

What it felt like.

(via)

forestfeast:

I have so many lemons right now I don’t know what to do with them all! So I tried candying them and they are quite nice atop ice cream with a bit of lemon zest. Crunchy and sweet. Enjoy!

Photos and Illustration by Erin Gleeson for The Forest Feast